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Sustaining Memories: Stories of Canadian Holocaust Survivors

Category: Book
Edited By: Draper, Paula
By (author): Muir, Lynda
Subject:  BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Historical
  HISTORY / Holocaust
  HISTORY / Jewish
  NON-FICTION / Canadian
Publisher: Azrieli Foundation
Published: January 2020
Format: Book-paperback
Pages: 312
Size: 9.00in x 6.00in x 0.25in
Our Price:
$ 17.95
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Additional Notes

From The Publisher*The Azrieli Foundation established the Sustaining Memories Project to help survivors write their stories. A unique partnership between survivors and volunteer writing partners who were trained to work with Holocaust survivors on recording and transcribing their stories, volunteers spent countless hours on these testimonies. The strength of the bonds that form when a volunteer and a survivor create a memoir, of the emotional challenges that a survivor faces in the telling and the understanding, and the insight that the listener experiences were all part of an incredible journey. Excerpts of these co-written memoirs, never before published, are produced in this anthology to give readers a wide range of understanding of the varieties of experiences of Holocaust survivors. Sustaining Memories gives voice to Canadian Jews who suffered through ghettos, camps, hiding, fighting in the underground, as refugees in foreign countries or passing as non-Jews in daily fear of betrayal. Following their liberation, survivors often had to congregate in displaced persons camps, where many married, had children and waited years for countries to offer them new homes. Some would end up in the detention camps of Cyprus on their way to pre-state Israel; others found themselves locked behind the Iron Curtain for decades. Between 1946 and the 1980s, they all built new lives in Canada.
From The Publisher*An anthology of excerpts from memoirs co-written by some ninety survivors of the Holocaust.
Review Quote*As the years go by, when I try to remember the faces of each member of my family, I see only an outline, a shadow, a blurry image, yet each image is covered with a halo. That is the memory etched in my mind. They have never aged, nor have I witnessed their funerals or seen the monuments of their final resting place. Therefore, they will forever remain young, alive and vibrant in my memory. (Arnold Friedman)
Biographical NoteDr. Paula Draper is a Holocaust historian and educator. An early advocate of memory history, she oversaw the videotaping of interviews with four hundred survivors in Toronto in 1986 and then became Lead International Trainer for Steven Spielberg's Shoah Foundation. She has taught in the History department of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), the Jewish Studies department of York University and the Canadian Studies department of University College, University of Toronto. Dr. Draper served as vice-president of the Association for Canadian Jewish Studies for nine years and has created texts for Holocaust-related exhibits in Toronto and Vancouver. She has published widely on the topic of Canada and the Holocaust and is now researching the post-war experiences of Canadian Holocaust survivors.