The Burgess Shale: The Canadian Writing Landscape of the 1960s

Category: Book
By (author): Atwood, Margaret
Introduction By: Carrière, Marie
Series: Clc Kreisel Lecture
Subject:  LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Composition & Creative Writing
  LITERARY CRITICISM / General
  LITERARY CRITICISM / Humor
Audience: general/trade
Publisher: The University of Alberta Press, Canadian Literature Centre / Centre de litterature canadienne
Published: February 2017
Format: Book-paperback
Pages: 88
Size: 9.00in x 5.25in x 0.25in
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Additional Notes

From The Publisher*Margaret Atwood considers the Canadian literary landscape of the 1960s to be like the Burgess Shale, a geological formation that contains the fossils of many weird and strange early life forms, different from but not unrelated to contemporary writerly ones. The Burgess Shale is not all about writerly pursuits, though. Atwood also gives readers some insight into the fashions and foibles of the times. Her recollections and anecdotes offer a wry and often humorous look at the early days of the institutions taken for granted today-from writers' unions and grant programs to book tours and festivals.
From The Publisher*How the writing landscape of the 1960s shaped the present literary topography in Canada.
From The Publisher*The Burgess Shale is a geological formation discovered in the Canadian Rocky Mountains that contains the fossils of many weird and strange early life forms, different from but not unrelated to later and existing forms. Atwood has named her re-visitation of the Canadian writing landscape of the 1960s after it, somewhat whimsically: that period is already fossilized, in a manner of speaking, and it does contain many weird and strange life forms. The generation of the 1960s was instrumental in creating the writer-related institutions we see around us today, from unions and private grant programs and prizes to book tours and book festivals; they did it, not for fun, but out of perceived need. Indeed, today's Canadian writing landscape would be mostly unrecognizable to those writing in the 1960s. Fans of Margaret Atwood, Canadian Literature enthusiasts, readers, and writers will find this book informative and entertaining.