Codependent No More Workbook

Category: Book
By (author): Beattie, Melody
Subject:  FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS / Interpersonal Relations
  FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS / Life Stages / General
  SELF-HELP / Codependency
  SELF-HELP / Recovery
Publisher: Hazelden Publishing
Published: February 2011
Format: Book-paperback
Pages: 200
Size: 9.25in x 7.38in x 0.50in
Our Price:
$ 21.75
Availability:
Available to order

Additional Notes

From The Publisher*This highly anticipated workbook will help readers put the principles from Melody Beattie's international best seller Codependent No More into action in their own lives. The Codependent No More Workbook was designed for Beattie fans spanning the generations, as well as for those who may not yet even understand the meaning and impact of their codependency. In this accessible and engaging workbook, Beattie uses her trademark down-to-earth style to offer readers a Twelve Step, interactive program to stop obsessing about others by developing the insight, strength, and resilience to start taking care of themselves. Through hands-on guided journaling, exercises, and self-tests, readers will learn to integrate the time-tested concepts outlined in Codependent No More into their daily lives by - setting and enforcing healthy limits - developing a support system through healthy relationships with others and a higher power - experiencing genuine love and forgiveness - letting go and detaching from others' harmful behaviorsWhether fixated on a loved one with depression, an addiction, an eating disorder, or other self-destructive behaviors, or someone who makes unhealthy decisions, this book offers the practical means to plot a comprehensive, personalized path to hope, healing, and the freedom to be your own best self.
From The Publisher*In celebration of the 25th anniversary of More--the self-help mainstay that has sold more than 5 million copies--Hazelden is pleased ot introduce the Codependent No More Workbook.
From The Publisher*The Codependent No More Workbook was designed for Beattie fans spanning the generations, as well as for those who may not yet even understand the meaning and impact of their codependency. In this accessible and engaging workbook, Beattie uses her trademark down-to-earth style to offer readers a Twelve Step, interactive program to stop obsessing about others by developing the insight, strength, and resilience to start taking care of themselves.
Review Quote*Book Review: Melody Beattie's Codependent No More Workbook One amazing insight I had while I read Melody Beattie's newCodependent No More Workbook a sequel to her 1986 bestseller, Codependent No More, reissued this month by Hazelden's press is this: I drank and took drugs to cope with my 'feelings' about the unbearable shit I tolerated as the child of an alcoholic family. Otherwise, I might have killed myself. So, in sense, drugs and alcohol saved me. Yeah, feelings: read frenzied rage, crippling fear. Flaming. Paralyzing. I wasn't abandoned, kidnapped or raped. What happened to me was, as just one example, my mother made me into her therapist and Best Friend.She griped about her unhappiness with her husband (my father) and their nonexistent, or often subpar, sex life.I thought it was my job to listen to it. It made her feel better. And then, he would come home and start drinking. And she would look at me, knowingly. And I had to keep her secrets. The whole drama gave me migraines and insomnia and crushing anxiety. Eventually a desire to instantaneously vaporize. I mean there were many moments when all I wanted to do was to stuff my bra with a bomb and set it off. It gave me no hope about the future. That sounds simple and maybe stupid, but think about it. Sixteen years old and NO HOPE. The next year, I started drinking. Fortunately, Melody Beattie is back to tell us that those of us who have lived with other people's addictions are not nuts if we felt like killing ourselves, and then used drugs to manage those 'feelings.' If You Came From Parents Who Were Addicts, How Do You Recover? Beattie articulates a problem I think faced by many who are trying to recover from both addiction and the consequences of growing up in addictive families. We found out we couldn't trust our parents who were the be-all, end-all to us as kids so how can we trust God/HP/whatever? What kind of 'HP' would give us childhoods like that? She says (or, rather, she quotes others saying) this mistrust can lead those of us who practice both kinds of program to misinterpret what AA says about self-will. When I first started going to meetings for my addiction, I heard this a lot: 'Whatever YOU want to do ?probably GOD doesn't want you to do it. You should do the opposite.' Well, wtf ?I WANTED to be a good mother for my kid and partner for my husband. I WANTED to start supporting myself financially and find work that made me happy. 'AA looked at self-will with disdain and disapproval,' Beattie quotes one person saying, in her chapter on Step 3. 'Al-Anon taught me it was essential to trust myself. Usually what felt right and good to me would be God's plans for me, not some disobedient flurry of self-will run riot and acting out. What I had a passion to do would be my higher purpose.' 'But how do I know if what I'm doing is my will or God's will for me?' Beattie herself asks. 'Hush,' she answers. 'Don't worry about that now.' The bottom line for Beattie