Whoosh!: Lonnie Johnson's Super-Soaking Stream of Inventions

Category: Book
By (author): Barton, Chris
Illustrated By: Tate, Don
Subject:  JUVENILE NONFICTION / Biography & Autobiography / Cultural Heritage
  JUVENILE NONFICTION / Biography & Autobiography / General
  JUVENILE NONFICTION / Biography & Autobiography / Science & Technology
  JUVENILE NONFICTION / Science & Nature / Experiments & Projects
Publisher: Charlesbridge
Published: May 2016
Format: Book-hardcover
Pages: 32
Size: 11.31in x 8.94in
Our Price:
$ 23.25
Availability:
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Additional Notes

From The Publisher*A cool idea with a big splash
 
You know the Super Soaker. It's one of top twenty toys of all time. And it was invented entirely by accident. Trying to create a new cooling system for refrigerators and air conditioners, impressive inventor Lonnie Johnson instead created the mechanics for the iconic toy.
 
A love for rockets, robots, inventions, and a mind for creativity began early in Lonnie Johnson's life. Growing up in a house full of brothers and sisters, persistence and a passion for problem solving became the cornerstone for a career as an engineer and his work with NASA. But it is his invention of the Super Soaker water gun that has made his most memorable splash with kids and adults.
Review Quote*♦ A tinkering African-American boy grows up to become the inventor of a very popular toy.
Lonnie Johnson always tinkered with something. As a kid, he built rockets and launched them in the park amid a crowd of friends. (He even made the rocket's fuel, which once caught fire in the kitchen. Oops.) As an adult he worked for NASA and helped to power the spacecraft Galileo as it explored Jupiter. But nothing is as memorable in the minds of kids as his most famous invention (to date): the Super-Soaker. While testing out a new cooling method for refrigerators, Johnson accidentally sprayed his entire bathroom, and the idea was born. However, the high-powered water gun was not an instant success. Barton shows the tenacity and dedication (and, sometimes, plain good timing) needed to prove ideas. From the initial blast of water that splashes the word "WHOOSH" across the page (and many pages after) to the gatefold that transforms into the Larami toy executives' (tellingly, mostly white) reactions-"WOW!"-Tate plays up the pressurized-water imagery to the hilt. In a thoughtful author's note, Barton explains how Johnson challenges the stereotypical white, Einstein-like vision of a scientist.
A delightfully child-friendly and painfully necessary diversification of the science field.
- Kirkus Reviews, starred review
Biographical NoteChris Barton is the award-winning, best-selling author of several books for children, including Shark vs. Train (Little, Brown) and The Day-Glo Brothers: The True Story of Bob and Joe Switzer's Bright Ideas and Brand-New Colors. He lives in Austin, Texas.
 
Don Tate is an award-winning author and illustrator of many books for children. His illustrated books include The Cart That Carried Martin and Hope's Gift (Putnam). He is also both author and illustrator of It Jes' Happened: When Bill Traylor Started to Draw (Lee & Low) as well as Poet: The Remarkable Story of George Moses Horton (Peach Tree). He lives in Austin, Texas.