On Becoming Cuban: Identity, Nationality, and Culture

Category: Book
By (author): P?rez, Louis A Jr
Series: H. Eugene And Lillian Youngs Lehman
Subject:  CURRENT EVENTS / General
  HISTORY / Caribbean & West Indies / General
  HISTORY / Latin America / General
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
Published: October 1999
Format: Book-hardcover
Pages: 608
Size: 9.50in x 6.38in x 2.00in
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$ 65.95
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Additional Notes

From The Publisher*With this masterful work, Louis A. PŽrez Jr. will transform the way we view Cuba and its relationship with the United States. On Becoming Cuban is a sweeping cultural history of the sustained encounter between the peoples of the two countries and of the ways that this encounter helped shape Cubans' identity, nationality, and sense of modernity from the early 1850s until the revolution of 1959.

Using an enormous range of Cuban and U.S. sources-from archival records and oral interviews to popular magazines, novels, and motion pictures-PŽrez reveals a powerful web of everyday, bilateral connections between the United States and Cuba and shows how U.S. cultural forms had a critical influence on the development of Cubans' sense of themselves as a people and as a nation. He also articulates the cultural context for the revolution that erupted in Cuba in 1959. In the middle of the twentieth century, PŽrez argues, when economic hard times and political crises combined to make Cubans painfully aware that their American-influenced expectations of prosperity and modernity would not be realized, the stage was set for revolution.

From The Publisher*With this masterful work, Louis A. P rez Jr. will transform the way we view Cuba and its relationship with the United States. On Becoming Cuban is a sweeping cultural history of the sustained encounter between the peoples of the two countries and of the ways that this encounter helped shape Cubans' identity, nationality, and sense of modernity from the early 1850s until the revolution of 1959.

Using an enormous range of Cuban and U.S. sources from archival records and oral interviews to popular magazines, novels, and motion pictures P rez reveals a powerful web of everyday, bilateral connections between the United States and Cuba and shows how U.S. cultural forms had a critical influence on the development of Cubans' sense of themselves as a people and as a nation. He also articulates the cultural context for the revolution that erupted in Cuba in 1959. In the middle of the twentieth century, P rez argues, when economic hard times and political crises combined to make Cubans painfully aware that their American-influenced expectations of prosperity and modernity would not be realized, the stage was set for revolution.

Review Quote*"A thoughtful exploration of Cuban-American relations."
- U.S. News & World Report Online
Review Quote*A roving exploration of the formation of the Cuban national character from the early 1800's to 1961.

New York Times

Review Quote*A thoughtful exploration of Cuban-American relations.

U.S. News & World Report Online

Review Quote*[PŽrez] reveals how the United States and Cuba have . . . lodged themselves irrevocably in each other's imagination.

Times Literary Supplement

Review Quote*Superbly researched scholarly book.

Los Angeles Times

Review Quote*Revelatory and engrossing. . . . An important addition to Latin American Studies.

Publishers Weekly