Phone Number
Phone Number

Taking to the Streets: Crowds, Politics, and the Urban Experience in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Montreal

Category: Book
By (author): Horner, Dan
Series: Studies On The History Of Quebec/etudes D'histoire Du Quebec
Subject:  HISTORY / Canada / General
  HISTORY / General
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
Published: July 2020
Format: Book-paperback
Pages: 352
Size: 9.01in x 5.98in x 1.00in
Our Price:
$ 37.95
Availability:
Available to order

Additional Notes

From The Publisher*The 1840s were a period of rapid growth and social conflict in Montreal. The city's public life was marked by a series of labour conflicts and bloody sectarian riots; at the same time, the ways that elites wielded power and ordinary people engaged in the political process were changing, particularly in public space. In Taking to the Streets Dan Horner examines how the urban environment became a vital and contentious political site during the tumultuous period from the end of the 1837-38 rebellions to the burning of Parliament in 1849. Employing a close reading of newspaper and judicial archives, he looks at a broad range of collective crowd experiences, including riots, labour demonstrations, religious processions, and parades. By examining how crowd events were used both to assert claims of political authority and to challenge their legitimacy, Horner charts the development of a contentious democratic political culture in British North America. Taking to the Streets is an important contribution to the political and urban history of pre-Confederation Canada and a timely reminder of how Montrealers from all walks of life have always used the streets to build community and make their voices heard.
From The Publisher*A historical perspective on public life and popular politics in the streets of Montreal.
Review Quote*"Taking to the Streets brings together considerable new empirical material, especially on the Irish and Catholic use of the streets, along with careful analyses of the more familiar events surrounding the Lachine Canal and the Rebellion Losses disputes. Horner is well-read in the relevant theoretical literature and ranges over the pertinent historical studies, not only in the Canadian literature, but also in the American and British." Gregory S Kealey, University of New Brunswick and author of Spying on Canadians: The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Security Service and the Origins of the Long Cold War
Biographical NoteDan Horner is associate professor in the Department of Criminology at Ryerson University and a member of the Montreal History Group.